Google to get rid of passwords on Android, replacing them with ‘trust score’

Google to get rid of passwords on Android, replacing them with ‘trust score’

Google wants you to stop using passwords. Why? Simply using a password isn’t considered very secure anymore. Made obvious by the fact that companies are getting hacked left and right with mass amounts of passwords exposed. Not to mention many people just aren’t using secure passwords in the first place. Another option is two-factor authentication, and it’s a good step-up. It requires something you know (your password) and something you have, like your phone or email. When you login with your password, you are sent a code via text or email. You then enter that code to complete the login. Although this is very secure, it’s also quite a hassle and takes more of your valuable time. Enter Google’s Trust Api. The Trust API is always running the background. It monitors how you use your device. Such as typing behavior, vocal inflections, facial recognition, and location. It then assigns a score base on how sure its you using the device.¬† Apps can then use this score to log you directly, without the need for a password. Depending on the app it may require a better score to login. For example a banking app would require a very high score, where as a game would be fine with a lower score. If the app doesn’t like the current trust score rating it may ask for your password just to be sure. “Why couldn’t it just know who I was, so I don’t need a password? It should just be able to work.” – Daniel Kaufman head of Google’s ATAP team. This is a great solution because it can be more...
Privacy vs Efficiency: Legalities, Part Two

Privacy vs Efficiency: Legalities, Part Two

Part one of this Privacy vs Efficiency segment touched on the struggle to maintain a level of customer privacy while achieving maximum technological efficiency. This segment will dive into the issues facing legislators. What are the consumer’s data rights? That’s the question that’s been being debated in Washington for the last few years. Surprise, surprise…they haven’t yet reached an answer. Although it may sound like a straight forward question, there are several angles to consider. First, think about all the other useful items in your life, aside from your smart phone, that make your life easier. Your credit card, for example, enables faster transactions without the hassle of managing cash or writing checks, but it creates a traceable¬†record of your spending habits. By using that credit card you give up a small amount of anonymity for the added convenience it offers. Millions of consumers feel that the added efficiency of credit card transactions outweigh their lost privacy. This type of intrusion into someone’s privacy can be related to most general tool apps. Weather apps store past locations for easier access later, and the general public would agree that this intrusion is helpful and acceptable. Legislators are more concerned about apps compiling location data and selling it then the simple act of saving the information. Supporters of the movement to reinforce consumer rights worry that apps that collect user information could sell it to advertisers to create detailed blueprints of a person’s life. This could include geographical maps of a person’s weekly routine, enabling advertisers to market you a brand of dish soap during the time you are usually at...